How To Get Rid Of Moles - Gophers - Burrowing Rodents



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Get Rid Of Moles

If you're tired of having your yard torn up by pesky Moles, Gophers or Voles you have come to the right place. At Get Rid Of Moles .com we offer proven solutions that will allow you to reclaim your lawn.

Information About Moles:

The common mole is a small burrowing mammal about 6 to 8 inches in length. With a long, tapering snout, a lack of external ears and barely detectable eyes moles are not the most beautiful of animals. Typical moles have rounded bodies covered with soft fur and exhibit sharply pointed muzzles. Although moles lack external ears they have highly acute hearing. Moles possess a keen sense of touch at the ends of their noses and tails. Their small eyes are covered with a thin membrane which is sensitive to changes in light but provides little visual precision. Moles have powerful legs and broad front feet which are ideal for tunneling. They are equipped with enormous digging claws. The moles shovel-like front feet are well adapted to digging through any type of soil. They can move backwards nearly as rapidly as they move forwards. Most moles are good swimmers and some, such as the star-nosed mole, thrive in wetlands. Moles tunnel just below the surface of the ground, where they forage for food. Moles are voracious eaters consuming over half their weight daily. Their diet consists of earthworms, insects, and root vegetation. Moles can dig about 75 feet of tunnels in a day.Their tunnels make characteristic ridges and mounds in gardens and lawns. Deeper burrows are used for living and pup rearing. A group of moles is called a labor of moles. Their young are normally born in the spring after five weeks gestation and consist of three to eight pups. In spring and summer months moles expand their territory as new additions require expanded habitat. How tunnels multiply: Moles build a nest burrow and several tunnels branching off from it. From these main tunnels, deeper underground, moles dig several side tunnels which rise towards the surface. Further temporary tunnels are dug from side tunnels. These tunnels are what the mole uses to look for food. Temporary tunnels are just under the surface of the soil. Moles seldom reuse temporary tunnels preferring to dig new ones in their voracious search for food. In your yard or garden you are most likely to encounter dirt raised above ground level which look like ridges. This is certain evidence of mole activity.


Mole repeller on the grass. Photo also shows mole repeller in the ground.

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Mole Repeller $19.95

SPECIFICATIONS: See product page for more info.

  • Power: Requires 4 "D" Batteries (Not Included)
  • Battery Life: 4 to 6 months
  • Weight: 9 oz.
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  • Frequency: 300 Hz
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    Sonic mole repeller on the grass. Photo also shows mole repeller in the ground.

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  • Power: Requires 4 "D" Batteries (Not Included)
  • Battery Life: 10 to 12 months in long life mode
  • Weight: 11.6 oz.
  • Dimensions: 16" x 1.5" diameter
  • Frequency: 300 Hz
  • Duty Cycle: 15 seconds
  • Coverage: 11,250 sq. ft. (1/4 acre)
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    Molechaser on the grass. Photo also shows molechaser in the ground.

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    SPECIFICATIONS: See product page for more info.

  • Power: Requires 4 "D" Batteries (Not Included)
  • Best for clay or hard soil (works on all types)
  • Battery Life: 4 to 6 months
  • Weight: 9 oz.
  • Dimensions: 16" x 1 3/4" diameter
  • Frequency: Multi-Modal
  • Duty Cycle: 8 seconds
  • Coverage: 16,000 sq. ft. (1/3 acre)
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    WORKS IN ALL SOIL TYPES
    ESPECIALLY IN HARD OR CLAY


    Solar Vibrosonic mole repeller on the grass. Photo also shows mole repeller in the ground.

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    Solar Vibrasonic Repeller $46.95 Sale Only $42.95

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  • Power: Solar Powered by Battery
  • Battery Life: Up to 4 days without recharging
  • Weight: 16 oz.
  • Dimensions: 12.5" x 3.125" diameter
  • Frequency: 300 Hz
  • Duty Cycle: 30 seconds
  • Coverage: Approximately 13,000 sq. ft. (1/3 acre)
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    WORKS IN ALL SOIL TYPES
    ESPECIALLY IN HARD OR CLAY


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  • Power: Solar Powered by Battery Life: Up to 5 days without recharging
  • Weight: 4 oz.
  • Dimensions: 2 5/8" x 11 3/8"
  • Frequency: 400 Hz
  • Duty Cycle: Sounds Every 30 Seconds
  • Coverage: Approximately 7,500 sq. ft. (1/6 acre)
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    There are seven species of North American mole. Species include the eastern garden mole of North America, Scalopus aquaticus, which is about 7 inch long with a 1-inch hairless tail. The toes on their feet are slightly webbed and they are most active in the crepuscular hours; those nearest dawn and dusk. The eastern mole has the largest range of any North American mole. The young are weaned and independent within one month and are sexually active by the next breeding season. Males range over a much broader area than females. As they burrow they thrust forward with their forefeet and follow on with their body; rotating their powerful forelimbs while pulling the dirt backwards and to the side. This mole will cause considerable root damage and has voracious energy requirements. Condylure christata, the Star-nosed mole, is a mole with a fantastic appearance. Looking like a visitor from outer space the Star-nosed mole displays a ring of 22 nimble protuberances which circle its snout. When found in marshy environments the Star-nosed mole is equally at home in the water, being a semiaquatic mole. The flexible fingers of its nose ring have been the subject of much scientific study. The ringed protuberances snatch food like an octopus and can also pick up sounds in the water. During the mating season the testes of the male Star-Nosed Mole can represent nearly ten percent of his total body weight. Parascalops breweri, the Hairy-tailed Mole, has a shorter snout and a fox-like tail (relatively speaking) and can be found from Canada to the Carolinas. White spots are often present on the abdomen, the tail is also ringed with scales and covered with long hairs. This mole appears to be most active during the day. Mating in early spring, moles of both sexes winter separately but by the late summer months males, females, and pups all utilize the same tunnel system. The smallest North American mole is the three inch shrew-mole, Neurotrichus gibsii, ranging widely in the Pacific Northwest. Shrew-moles sometimes prefer a forest habitat, and, unlike other moles, spend part of their time above ground. Shrew-moles have the longest known breeding season lasting from February through August. Having high metabolisms they will rapidly die of starvation if deprived of food. Another amazing behavior of this mole is the fact that it sleeps between 2 and 10 minutes before returning to work for periods of 3 to 20 minutes. Most other moles tend to work and sleep in 4 hour shifts. Coast Moles Scapanus orarius are sometimes called pacific moles. They are highly fossorial in behavior. Coast moles are primarily known for the numerous molehills that outline their home ranges. Townsend's Mole is the largest of the western moles, genus Scapanus, and may reach a length of over 9 inches. Townsend's range is narrow when compared with the distribution of the Coast Mole. Scapanus townsendii breeds once a year between mid November and late February. Females prepare the nest with grasses and leaves. She may construct several exit tunnels from her nest. Above ground her nesting construction is often revealed by one large mound or several shorter mounds arranged in a circle.

    Mole Repellers:

    Our Mole repellers are the most humane and environmental friendly way of keeping gardens and lawns free of destructive moles, gophers and voles. Moles have poor eyesight, yet nature has given them a very acute sense of hearing and sensitivity to ground vibration. The technology in our repellers exploits this sensitivity to produce a penetrating sonic sound that irritates moles, voles, gophers and burrowing rodents which may utilize tunnels dug by moles. We can help you get rid of moles without dangerous traps or poison. Our products are safe for use around pets and children.

    How fast
    can moles multiply?

    Having litters of 6 to 8 pups one pair of moles, could, in their lifetime, give rise to nearly 2,000 moles. Clearly, the sooner you can get rid of moles the better!
     

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    How fast
    can moles dig?

    They can tunnel at over 16 feet an hour and can travel through finished tunnels at over 75 feet per minute. That's one reason they're nearly impossible to catch. Underground, in their element, they can move faster than greased lighting!